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UIST2.0 Archive - 20 years of UIST
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pen

digital pen

In Proceedings of UIST 2003
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Paper augmented digital documents (p. 51-60)

pen

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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SATIN: a toolkit for informal ink-based applications (p. 63-72)

In Proceedings of UIST 2003
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Stylus input and editing without prior selection of mode (p. 213-216)

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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Collapse-to-zoom: viewing web pages on small screen devices by interactively removing irrelevant content (p. 91-94)

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Lineogrammer: creating diagrams by drawing (p. 161-170)

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We present the design of Lineogrammer, a diagram-drawing system motivated by the immediacy and fluidity of pencil-drawing. We attempted for Lineogrammer to feel like a modeless diagramming "medium" in which stylus input is immediately interpreted as a command, text label or a drawing element, and drawing elements snap to or sculpt from existing elements. An inferred dual representation allows geometric diagram elements, no matter how they were entered, to be manipulated at granularities ranging from vertices to lines to shapes. We also integrate lightweight tools, based on rulers and construction lines, for controlling higher-level diagram attributes, such as symmetry and alignment. We include preliminary usability observations to help identify areas of strength and weakness with this approach.

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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An exploration of pen rolling for pen-based interaction (p. 191-200)

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Current pen input mainly utilizes the position of the pen tip, and occasionally, a button press. Other possible device parameters, such as rolling the pen around its longitudinal axis, are rarely used. We explore pen rolling as a supporting input modality for pen-based interaction. Through two studies, we are able to determine 1) the parameters that separate intentional pen rolling for the purpose of interaction from incidental pen rolling caused by regular writing and drawing, and 2) the parameter range within which accurate and timely intentional pen rolling interactions can occur. Building on our experimental results, we present an exploration of the design space of rolling-based interaction techniques, which showcase three scenarios where pen rolling interactions can be useful: enhanced stimulus-response compatibility in rotation tasks [7], multi-parameter input, and simplified mode selection.

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Pen + touch = new tools (p. 27-36)

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We describe techniques for direct pen+touch input. We observe people's manual behaviors with physical paper and notebooks. These serve as the foundation for a prototype Microsoft Surface application, centered on note-taking and scrapbooking of materials. Based on our explorations we advocate a division of labor between pen and touch: the pen writes, touch manipulates, and the combination of pen + touch yields new tools. This articulates how our system interprets unimodal pen, unimodal touch, and multimodal pen+touch inputs, respectively. For example, the user can hold a photo and drag off with the pen to create and place a copy; hold a photo and cross it in a freeform path with the pen to slice it in two; or hold selected photos and tap one with the pen to staple them all together. Touch thus unifies object selection with mode switching of the pen, while the muscular tension of holding touch serves as the "glue" that phrases together all the inputs into a unitary multimodal gesture. This helps the UI designer to avoid encumbrances such as physical buttons, persistent modes, or widgets that detract from the user's focus on the workspace.

pen based computing

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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The metropolis keyboard - an exploration of quantitative techniques for virtual keyboard design (p. 119-128)

pen based interaction

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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ModelCraft: capturing freehand annotations and edits on physical 3D models (p. 13-22)

pen based interface

In Proceedings of UIST 1994
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Translucent patches---dissolving windows (p. 121-130)

pen based system

In Proceedings of UIST 1996
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Ambiguous intentions: a paper-like interface for creative design (p. 183-192)

pen based user interface

pen computing

In Proceedings of UIST 1998
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Path drawing for 3D walkthrough (p. 173-174)

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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Hierarchical parsing and recognition of hand-sketched diagrams (p. 13-22)

pen gesture

In Proceedings of UIST 2001
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Cursive: a novel interaction technique for controlling expressive avatar gesture (p. 151-152)

pen input

In Proceedings of UIST 1998
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Integrating pen operations for composition by example (p. 211-212)

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Interacting with dynamically defined information spaces using a handheld projector and a pen (p. 225-234)

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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OctoPocus: a dynamic guide for learning gesture-based command sets (p. 37-46)

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We describe OctoPocus, an example of a dynamic guide that combines on-screen feedforward and feedback to help users learn, execute and remember gesture sets. OctoPocus can be applied to a wide range of single-stroke gestures and recognition algorithms and helps users progress smoothly from novice to expert performance. We provide an analysis of the design space and describe the results of two experi-ments that show that OctoPocus is significantly faster and improves learning of arbitrary gestures, compared to con-ventional Help menus. It can also be adapted to a mark-based gesture set, significantly improving input time compared to a two-level, four-item Hierarchical Marking menu.

pen input device

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Multi-layer interaction for digital tables (p. 269-272)

pen interface

In Proceedings of UIST 1997
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Pick-and-drop: a direct manipulation technique for multiple computer environments (p. 31-39)

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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Dual touch: a two-handed interface for pen-based PDAs (p. 211-212)

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Mobile interaction using paperweight metaphor (p. 111-114)

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Pen-top feedback for paper-based interfaces (p. 201-210)

pen user interface

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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A remote control interface for large displays (p. 127-136)

pens

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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Hierarchical parsing and recognition of hand-sketched diagrams (p. 13-22)

speech and pen input

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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Multimodal system processing in mobile environments (p. 21-30)