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sketching

3d sketching

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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EverybodyLovesSketch: 3D sketching for a broader audience (p. 59-68)

Abstract plus

We present EverybodyLovesSketch, a gesture-based 3D curve sketching system for rapid ideation and visualization of 3D forms, aimed at a broad audience. We first analyze traditional perspective drawing in professional practice. We then design a system built upon the paradigm of ILoveSketch, a 3D curve drawing system for design professionals. The new system incorporates many interaction aspects of perspective drawing with judicious automation to enable novices with no perspective training to proficiently create 3D curve sketches. EverybodyLovesSketch supports a number of novel interactions: tick-based sketch plane selection, single view definition of arbitrary extrusion vectors, multiple extruded surface sketching, copy-and-project of 3D curves, freeform surface sketching, and an interactive perspective grid. Finally, we present a study involving 49 high school students (with no formal artistic training) who each learned and used the system over 11 days, which provides detailed insights into the popularity, power and usability of the various techniques, and shows our system to be easily learnt and effectively used, with broad appeal.

dynamic sketching

In Proceedings of UIST 1999
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ActiveText: a method for creating dynamic and interactive texts (p. 131-140)

perspective sketching

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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EverybodyLovesSketch: 3D sketching for a broader audience (p. 59-68)

Abstract plus

We present EverybodyLovesSketch, a gesture-based 3D curve sketching system for rapid ideation and visualization of 3D forms, aimed at a broad audience. We first analyze traditional perspective drawing in professional practice. We then design a system built upon the paradigm of ILoveSketch, a 3D curve drawing system for design professionals. The new system incorporates many interaction aspects of perspective drawing with judicious automation to enable novices with no perspective training to proficiently create 3D curve sketches. EverybodyLovesSketch supports a number of novel interactions: tick-based sketch plane selection, single view definition of arbitrary extrusion vectors, multiple extruded surface sketching, copy-and-project of 3D curves, freeform surface sketching, and an interactive perspective grid. Finally, we present a study involving 49 high school students (with no formal artistic training) who each learned and used the system over 11 days, which provides detailed insights into the popularity, power and usability of the various techniques, and shows our system to be easily learnt and effectively used, with broad appeal.

sketching

In Proceedings of UIST 1997
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Interactive beautification: a technique for rapid geometric design (p. 105-114)

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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SATIN: a toolkit for informal ink-based applications (p. 63-72)

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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Fluid sketches: continuous recognition and morphing of simple hand-drawn shapes (p. 73-80)

In Proceedings of UIST 2001
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The designers' outpost: a tangible interface for collaborative web site (p. 1-10)

In Proceedings of UIST 2005
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Informal prototyping of continuous graphical interactions by demonstration (p. 221-230)

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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SketchWizard: Wizard of Oz prototyping of pen-based user interfaces (p. 119-128)

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SketchWizard allows designers to create Wizard of Oz prototypes of pen-based user interfaces in the early stages of design. In the past, designers have been inhibited from participating in the design of pen-based interfaces because of the inadequacy of paper prototypes and the difficulty of developing functional prototypes. In SketchWizard, designers and end users share a drawing canvas between two computers, allowing the designer to simulate the behavior of recognition or other technologies. Special editing features are provided to help designers respond quickly to end-user input. This paper describes the SketchWizard system and presents two evaluations of our approach. The first is an early feasibility study in which Wizard of Oz was used to prototype a pen-based user interface. The second is a laboratory study in which designers used SketchWizard to simulate existing pen-based interfaces. Both showed that end users gave valuable feedback in spite of delays between end-user actions and wizard updates.

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Kinematic templates: end-user tools for content-relative cursor manipulations (p. 47-56)

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This paper introduces kinematic templates, an end-user tool for defining content-specific motor space manipulations in the context of editing 2D visual compositions. As an example, a user can choose the "sandpaper" template to define areas within a drawing where cursor movement should slow down. Our current implementation provides templates that amplify or dampen the cursor's speed, attenuate jitter in a user's movement, guide movement along paths, and add forces to the cursor. Multiple kinematic templates can be defined within a document, with overlapping templates resulting in a form of function composition. A template's strength can also be varied, enabling one to improve one's strokes without losing the human element. Since kinematic templates guide movements, rather than strictly prescribe them, they constitute a visual composition aid that lies between unaided freehand drawing and rigid drawing aids such as snapping guides, masks, and perfect geometric primitives.

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Lineogrammer: creating diagrams by drawing (p. 161-170)

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We present the design of Lineogrammer, a diagram-drawing system motivated by the immediacy and fluidity of pencil-drawing. We attempted for Lineogrammer to feel like a modeless diagramming "medium" in which stylus input is immediately interpreted as a command, text label or a drawing element, and drawing elements snap to or sculpt from existing elements. An inferred dual representation allows geometric diagram elements, no matter how they were entered, to be manipulated at granularities ranging from vertices to lines to shapes. We also integrate lightweight tools, based on rulers and construction lines, for controlling higher-level diagram attributes, such as symmetry and alignment. We include preliminary usability observations to help identify areas of strength and weakness with this approach.

sketching of interactive physical form

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Rapid construction of functioning physical interfaces from cardboard, thumbtacks, tin foil and masking tape (p. 289-298)