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UIST2.0 Archive - 20 years of UIST
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feedback

3d interaction feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 1996
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Penumbrae for 3D interactions (p. 165-166)

auditory feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 1995
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A tool to support speech and non-speech audio feedback generation in audio interfaces (p. 171-179)

feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Pen-top feedback for paper-based interfaces (p. 201-210)

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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OctoPocus: a dynamic guide for learning gesture-based command sets (p. 37-46)

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We describe OctoPocus, an example of a dynamic guide that combines on-screen feedforward and feedback to help users learn, execute and remember gesture sets. OctoPocus can be applied to a wide range of single-stroke gestures and recognition algorithms and helps users progress smoothly from novice to expert performance. We provide an analysis of the design space and describe the results of two experi-ments that show that OctoPocus is significantly faster and improves learning of arbitrary gestures, compared to con-ventional Help menus. It can also be adapted to a mark-based gesture set, significantly improving input time compared to a two-level, four-item Hierarchical Marking menu.

feedback ambiguity

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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Ripples: utilizing per-contact visualizations to improve user interaction with touch displays (p. 3-12)

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We present Ripples, a system which enables visualizations around each contact point on a touch display and, through these visualizations, provides feedback to the user about successes and errors of their touch interactions. Our visualization system is engineered to be overlaid on top of existing applications without requiring the applications to be modified in any way, and functions independently of the application's responses to user input. Ripples reduces the fundamental problem of ambiguity of feedback when an action results in an unexpected behaviour. This ambiguity can be caused by a wide variety of sources. We describe the ambiguity problem, and identify those sources. We then define a set of visual states and transitions needed to resolve this ambiguity, of use to anyone designing touch applications or systems. We then present the Ripples implementation of visualizations for those states, and the results of a user study demonstrating user preference for the system, and demonstrating its utility in reducing errors.

force feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 1998
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An insidious Haptic invasion: adding force feedback to the X desktop (p. 59-64)

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Tapping and rubbing: exploring new dimensions of tactile feedback with voice coil motors (p. 181-190)

Abstract plus

Tactile feedback allows devices to communicate with users when visual and auditory feedback are inappropriate. Unfortunately, current vibrotactile feedback is abstract and not related to the content of the message. This often clash-es with the nature of the message, for example, when sending a comforting message.

We propose addressing this by extending the repertoire of haptic notifications. By moving an actuator perpendicular to the user's skin, our prototype device can tap the user. Moving the actuator parallel to the user's skin induces rub-bing. Unlike traditional vibrotactile feedback, tapping and rubbing convey a distinct emotional message, similar to those induced by human-human touch.

To enable these techniques we built a device we call soundTouch. It translates audio wave files into lateral motion using a voice coil motor found in computer hard drives. SoundTouch can produce motion from below 1Hz to above 10kHz with high precision and fidelity.

We present the results of two exploratory studies. We found that participants were able to distinguish a range of taps and rubs. Our findings also indicate that tapping and rubbing are perceived as being similar to touch interactions exchanged by humans.

haptic force feedback

interface feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 2000
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Illusions of infinity: feedback for infinite worlds (p. 237-238)

tactile feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 1995
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The virtual tricorder: a uniform interface for virtual reality (p. 39-40)

In Proceedings of UIST 2002
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Ambient touch: designing tactile interfaces for handheld devices (p. 51-60)

In Proceedings of UIST 2003
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Tactile interfaces for small touch screens (p. 217-220)

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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Haptic pen: a tactile feedback stylus for touch screens (p. 291-294)

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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SemFeel: a user interface with semantic tactile feedback for mobile touch-screen devices (p. 111-120)

Abstract plus

One of the challenges with using mobile touch-screen devices is that they do not provide tactile feedback to the user. Thus, the user is required to look at the screen to interact with these devices. In this paper, we present SemFeel, a tactile feedback system which informs the user about the presence of an object where she touches on the screen and can offer additional semantic information about that item. Through multiple vibration motors that we attached to the backside of a mobile touch-screen device, SemFeel can generate different patterns of vibration, such as ones that flow from right to left or from top to bottom, to help the user interact with a mobile device. Through two user studies, we show that users can distinguish ten different patterns, including linear patterns and a circular pattern, at approximately 90% accuracy, and that SemFeel supports accurate eyes-free interactions.

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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TeslaTouch: electrovibration for touch surfaces (p. 283-292)

Abstract plus

We present a new technology for enhancing touch interfaces with tactile feedback. The proposed technology is based on the electrovibration principle, does not use any moving parts and provides a wide range of tactile feedback sensations to fingers moving across a touch surface. When combined with an interactive display and touch input, it enables the design of a wide variety of interfaces that allow the user to feel virtual elements through touch. We present the principles of operation and an implementation of the technology. We also report the results of three controlled psychophysical experiments and a subjective user evaluation that describe and characterize users' perception of this technology. We conclude with an exploration of the design space of tactile touch screens using two comparable setups, one based on electrovibration and another on mechanical vibrotactile actuation.

vibrotactile feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Gilded gait: reshaping the urban experience with augmented footsteps (p. 185-188)

Abstract plus

In this paper we describe Gilded Gait, a system that changes the perceived physical texture of the ground, as felt through the soles of users' feet. Ground texture, in spite of its potential as an effective channel of peripheral information display, has so far been paid little attention in HCI research. The system is designed as a pair of insoles with embedded actuators, and utilizes vibrotactile feedback to simulate the perceptions of a range of different ground textures. The discreet, low-key nature of the interface makes it particularly suited for outdoor use, and its capacity to alter how people experience the built environment may open new possibilities in urban design.

visual feedback

In Proceedings of UIST 1999
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The role of kinesthetic reference frames in two-handed input performance (p. 171-178)