Keywords
UIST2.0 Archive - 20 years of UIST
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software

component software

desktop software

In Proceedings of UIST 1997
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TimeSlider: an interface to specify time point (p. 43-44)

development process for interactive system software

In Proceedings of UIST 1995
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Automatic generation of task-oriented help (p. 181-187)

interactive software

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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Measuring how design changes cognition at work (p. 1-2)

Abstract plus

The various fields associated with interactive software systems engage in design activities to enable people who would use the resulting systems to meet goals, coordinate with others, find meaning, and express themselves in myriad ways. Yet many development projects fail, and we all have contact with clumsy software-based systems that force work-arounds and impose substantial attentional, knowledge and workload burdens. On the other hand, field observations reveal people re-shaping the artifacts they encounter and interact with as resources to cope with the demands of the situations they face as they seek to meet their goals. In this process some new devices are quickly seized upon and exploited in ways that transform the nature of human activity, connections, and expression.

The software intensive interactive systems and devices under development around us are valuable to the degree that they expand what people in various roles and organizations can achieve. How can we measure this value provided to others? Are current measures of usability adequate? Does creeping complexity wipe out incremental gains as products evolve? Do designers and developers mis-project the impact when systems-to-be-realized are fielded? Which technology changes will trigger waves of expansive adaptations that transform what people do and even why they do it.

Sponsors of projects to develop new interactive software systems are asking developers for tangible evidence of the value to be delivered to those people responsible for activities and goals in the world. Traditional measures of usability and human performance seem inadequate. Cycles of inflation in the claims development organizations make (and the legacy of disappointment and surprise) have left sponsors numb and eroded trust. Thus, we need to provide new forms of evidence about the potential of new interactive systems and devices to enhance human capability.

Luckily, this need has been accompanied by a period of innovation in ways to measure the impact of new designs on:

  • growth of expertise in roles,
  • synchronizing activities over wider scopes and ranges,
  • expanding adaptive capacities.
.

This talk reviews a few of the new measures being tested in each of these categories, points to some of the underlying science, and uses these examples to trigger discussion about how design of future interactive software provides will provide value to stakeholders.

social software

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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Socially augmenting employee profiles with people-tagging (p. 91-100)

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Employee directories play a valuable role in helping people find others to collaborate with, solve a problem, or provide needed expertise. Serving this role successfully requires accurate and up-to-date user profiles, yet few users take the time to maintain them. In this paper, we present a system that enables users to tag other users with key words that are displayed on their profiles. We discuss how people-tagging is a form of social bookmarking that enables people to organize their contacts into groups, annotate them with terms supporting future recall, and search for people by topic area. In addition, we show that people-tagging has a valuable side benefit: it enables the community to collectively maintain each others' interest and expertise profiles. Our user studies suggest that people tag other people as a form of contact management and that the tags they have been given are accurate descriptions of their interests and expertise. Moreover, none of the people interviewed reported offensive or inappropriate tags. Based on our results, we believe that peopletagging will become an important tool for relationship management in an organization.

software and technology

In Proceedings of UIST 1995
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GLEAN: a computer-based tool for rapid GOMS model usability evaluation of user interface designs (p. 91-100)

software architecture

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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Revisiting visual interface programming: creating GUI tools for designers and programmers (p. 267-276)

software bus

In Proceedings of UIST 1993
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User interfaces for symbolic computation: a case study (p. 1-10)

software component

In Proceedings of UIST 1997
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CyberDesk: a framework for providing self-integrating ubiquitous software services (p. 75-76)

software development

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Gestalt: integrated support for implementation and analysis in machine learning (p. 37-46)

Abstract plus

We present Gestalt, a development environment designed to support the process of applying machine learning. While traditional programming environments focus on source code, we explicitly support both code and data. Gestalt allows developers to implement a classification pipeline, analyze data as it moves through that pipeline, and easily transition between implementation and analysis. An experiment shows this significantly improves the ability of developers to find and fix bugs in machine learning systems. Our discussion of Gestalt and our experimental observations provide new insight into general-purpose support for the machine learning process.

software engineering

In Proceedings of UIST 1993
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User interfaces for symbolic computation: a case study (p. 1-10)

software framework

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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The ProD framework for proactive displays (p. 221-230)

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A proactive display is an application that selects content to display based on the set of users who have been detected nearby. For example, the Ticket2Talk [17] proactive display application presented content for users so that other people would know something about them.

It is our view that promising patterns for proactive display applications have been discovered, and now we face the need for frameworks to support the range of applications that are possible in this design space.

In this paper, we present the Proactive Display (ProD) Framework, which allows for the easy construction of proactive display applications. It allows a range of proactive display applications, including ones already in the literature. ProD also enlarges the design space of proactive display systems by allowing a variety of new applications that incorporate different views of social life and community.

software help

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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Graphstract: minimal graphical help for computers (p. 203-212)

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We explore the use of abstracted screenshots as part of a new help interface. Graphstract, an implementation of a graphical help system, extends the ideas of textually oriented Minimal Manuals to the use of screenshots, allowing multiple small graphical elements to be shown in a limited space. This allows a user to get an overview of a complex sequential task as a whole. The ideas have been developed by three iterations of prototyping and evaluation. A user study shows that Graphstract helps users perform tasks faster on some but not all tasks. Due to their graphical nature, it is possible to construct Graphstracts automatically from pre-recorded interactions. A second study shows that automated capture and replay is a low-cost method for authoring Graphstracts, and the resultant help is as understandable as manually constructed help.

software visualization

In Proceedings of UIST 1994
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Nova: low-cost data animation using a radar-sweep metaphor (p. 131-132)

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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An explanation-based, visual debugger for one-way constraints (p. 207-216)

user interface software

In Proceedings of UIST 1996
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XXL: a dual approach for building user interfaces (p. 99-108)

In Proceedings of UIST 1996
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Inductive groups (p. 193-199)

user interface software and technology

user-interface software and technology

In Proceedings of UIST 1995
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The world through the computer: computer augmented interaction with real world environments (p. 29-36)