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UIST2.0 Archive - 20 years of UIST
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desktop

desktop

In Proceedings of UIST 2005
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Predictive interaction using the delphian desktop (p. 133-141)

desktop assistant

In Proceedings of UIST 1997
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Supporting cooperative and personal surfing with a desktop assistant (p. 129-138)

desktop computing

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Re-framing the desktop interface around the activities of knowledge work (p. 211-220)

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The venerable desktop metaphor is beginning to show signs of strain in supporting modern knowledge work. In this paper, we examine how the desktop metaphor can be re-framed, shifting the focus away from a low-level (and increasingly obsolete) focus on documents and applications to an interface based upon the creation of and interaction with manually declared, semantically meaningful activities. We begin by unpacking some of the foundational assumptions of desktop interface design, describe an activity-based model for organizing the desktop interface based on theories of cognition and observations of real-world practice, and identify a series of high-level system requirements for interfaces that use activity as their primary organizing principle. Based on these requirements, we present the novel interface design of the Giornata system, a prototype activity-based desktop interface, and share initial findings from a longitudinal deployment of the Giornata system in a real-world setting.

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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Mouse 2.0: multi-touch meets the mouse (p. 33-42)

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In this paper we present novel input devices that combine the standard capabilities of a computer mouse with multi-touch sensing. Our goal is to enrich traditional pointer-based desktop interactions with touch and gestures. To chart the design space, we present five different multi-touch mouse implementations. Each explores a different touch sensing strategy, which leads to differing form-factors and hence interactive possibilities. In addition to the detailed description of hardware and software implementations of our prototypes, we discuss the relative strengths, limitations and affordances of these novel input devices as informed by the results of a preliminary user study.

desktop environment

In Proceedings of UIST 1999
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Time-machine computing: a time-centric approach for the information environment (p. 45-54)

desktop software

In Proceedings of UIST 1997
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TimeSlider: an interface to specify time point (p. 43-44)

desktop vr

In Proceedings of UIST 1998
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Data mountain: using spatial memory for document management (p. 153-162)

interactive desktop

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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Video-based document tracking: unifying your physical and electronic desktops (p. 99-107)