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UIST2.0 Archive - 20 years of UIST
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computation

human computation

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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Collabio: a game for annotating people within social networks (p. 97-100)

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We present Collabio, a social tagging game within an online social network that encourages friends to tag one another. Collabio's approach of incentivizing members of the social network to generate information about each other produces personalizing information about its users. We report usage log analysis, survey data, and a rating exercise demonstrating that Collabio tags are accurate and augment information that could have been scraped online.

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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TurKit: human computation algorithms on mechanical turk (p. 57-66)

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Mechanical Turk (MTurk) provides an on-demand source of human computation. This provides a tremendous opportunity to explore algorithms which incorporate human computation as a function call. However, various systems challenges make this difficult in practice, and most uses of MTurk post large numbers of independent tasks. TurKit is a toolkit for prototyping and exploring algorithmic human computation, while maintaining a straight-forward imperative programming style. We present the crash-and-rerun programming model that makes TurKit possible, along with a variety of applications for human computation algorithms. We also present case studies of TurKit used for real experiments across different fields.

real-time human computation

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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VizWiz: nearly real-time answers to visual questions (p. 333-342)

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The lack of access to visual information like text labels, icons, and colors can cause frustration and decrease independence for blind people. Current access technology uses automatic approaches to address some problems in this space, but the technology is error-prone, limited in scope, and quite expensive. In this paper, we introduce VizWiz, a talking application for mobile phones that offers a new alternative to answering visual questions in nearly real-time - asking multiple people on the web. To support answering questions quickly, we introduce a general approach for intelligently recruiting human workers in advance called quikTurkit so that workers are available when new questions arrive. A field deployment with 11 blind participants illustrates that blind people can effectively use VizWiz to cheaply answer questions in their everyday lives, highlighting issues that automatic approaches will need to address to be useful. Finally, we illustrate the potential of using VizWiz as part of the participatory design of advanced tools by using it to build and evaluate VizWiz::LocateIt, an interactive mobile tool that helps blind people solve general visual search problems.

symbolic computation

In Proceedings of UIST 1993
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User interfaces for symbolic computation: a case study (p. 1-10)