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phone

camera phone

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Camera phone based motion sensing: interaction techniques, applications and performance study (p. 101-110)

cell phone

In Proceedings of UIST 2001
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Toward more sensitive mobile phones (p. 191-192)

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Lightweight material detection for placement-aware mobile computing (p. 279-282)

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Numerous methods have been proposed that allow mobile devices to determine where they are located (e.g., home or office) and in some cases, predict what activity the user is currently engaged in (e.g., walking, sitting, or driving). While useful, this sensing currently only tells part of a much richer story. To allow devices to act most appropriately to the situation they are in, it would also be very helpful to know about their placement - for example whether they are sitting on a desk, hidden in a drawer, placed in a pocket, or held in one's hand - as different device behaviors may be called for in each of these situations. In this paper, we describe a simple, small, and inexpensive multispectral optical sensor for identifying materials in proximity to a device. This information can be used in concert with e.g., location information, to estimate, for example, that the device is "sitting on the desk at home", or "in the pocket at work". This paper discusses several potential uses of this technology, as well as results from a two-part study, which indicates that this technique can detect placement at 94.4% accuracy with real-world placement sets.

cellular phone

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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OPA browser: a web browser for cellular phone users (p. 71-80)

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Cellular phones are widely used to access the WWW. However, most available Web pages are designed for desktop PCs. Cellular phones only have small screens and poor interfaces, and thus, it is inconvenient to browse such large sized pages. In addition, cellular phone users browse Web pages in various situations, so that appropriate presentation styles for Web pages depend on users' situations. In this paper, we propose a novel Web browsing system for cellular phones that allocates various functions for Web browsing on each numerical key of a cellular phone. Users can browse Web pages comfortably, selecting appropriate functions according to their situations by pushing a single button.

mobile phone

In Proceedings of UIST 2001
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LetterWise: prefix-based disambiguation for mobile text input (p. 111-120)

In Proceedings of UIST 2003
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TiltText: using tilt for text input to mobile phones (p. 81-90)

In Proceedings of UIST 2004
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A gesture-based authentication scheme for untrusted public terminals (p. 157-160)

In Proceedings of UIST 2006
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Camera phone based motion sensing: interaction techniques, applications and performance study (p. 101-110)

In Proceedings of UIST 2008
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Browsing large HTML tables on small screens (p. 259-268)

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We propose new interaction techniques that support better browsing of large HTML tables on small screen devices, such as mobile phones. We propose three modes for browsing tables: normal mode, record mode, and cell mode. Normal mode renders tables in the ordinary way, but provides various useful functions for browsing large tables, such as hiding unnecessary rows and columns. Record mode regards each row (or column) as the basic information unit and displays it in a record-like format with column (or row) headers, while cell mode regards each cell as the basic unit and displays each cell together with its corresponding row and column headers. For these table presentations, we need to identify row and column headers that explain the meaning of rows and columns. To provide users with both row and column headers even when the tables have attributes for only one of them, we introduce the concept of keys and develop a method of automatically discovering attributes and keys in tables. Another issue in these presentations is how to handle composite cells spanning multiple rows or columns. We determine the semantics of such composite cells and render them in appropriate ways in accordance with their semantics.

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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PhoneTouch: a technique for direct phone interaction on surfaces (p. 13-16)

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PhoneTouch is a novel technique for integration of mobile phones and interactive surfaces. The technique enables use of phones to select targets on the surface by direct touch, facilitating for instance pick&drop-style transfer of objects between phone and surface. The technique is based on separate detection of phone touch events by the surface, which determines location of the touch, and by the phone, which contributes device identity. The device-level observations are merged based on correlation in time. We describe a proof-of-concept implementation of the technique, using vision for touch detection on the surface (including discrimination of finger versus phone touch) and acceleration features for detection by the phone.

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Jogging over a distance between Europe and Australia (p. 189-198)

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Exertion activities, such as jogging, require users to invest intense physical effort and are associated with physical and social health benefits. Despite the benefits, our understanding of exertion activities is limited, especially when it comes to social experiences. In order to begin understanding how to design for technologically augmented social exertion experiences, we present "Jogging over a Distance", a system in which spatialized audio based on heart rate allowed runners as far apart as Europe and Australia to run together. Our analysis revealed how certain aspects of the design facilitated a social experience, and consequently we describe a framework for designing augmented exertion activities. We make recommendations as to how designers could use this framework to aid the development of future social systems that aim to utilize the benefits of exertion.

web phone

In Proceedings of UIST 2001
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From desktop to phonetop: a UI for web interaction on very small devices (p. 121-130)