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cursor

area cursor

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Enhanced area cursors: reducing fine pointing demands for people with motor impairments (p. 153-162)

Abstract plus

Computer users with motor impairments face major challenges with conventional mouse pointing. These challenges are mostly due to fine pointing corrections at the final stages of target acquisition. To reduce the need for correction-phase pointing and to lessen the effects of small target size on acquisition difficulty, we introduce four enhanced area cursors, two of which rely on magnification and two of which use goal crossing. In a study with motor-impaired and able-bodied users, we compared the new designs to the point and Bubble cursors, the latter of which had not been evaluated for users with motor impairments. Two enhanced area cursors, the Visual-Motor-Magnifier and Click-and-Cross, were the most successful new designs for users with motor impairments, reducing selection time for small targets by 19%, corrective submovements by 45%, and error rate by up to 82% compared to the point cursor. Although the Bubble cursor also improved performance, participants with motor impairments unanimously preferred the enhanced area cursors.

bubble cursor

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
Article Picture

Enhanced area cursors: reducing fine pointing demands for people with motor impairments (p. 153-162)

Abstract plus

Computer users with motor impairments face major challenges with conventional mouse pointing. These challenges are mostly due to fine pointing corrections at the final stages of target acquisition. To reduce the need for correction-phase pointing and to lessen the effects of small target size on acquisition difficulty, we introduce four enhanced area cursors, two of which rely on magnification and two of which use goal crossing. In a study with motor-impaired and able-bodied users, we compared the new designs to the point and Bubble cursors, the latter of which had not been evaluated for users with motor impairments. Two enhanced area cursors, the Visual-Motor-Magnifier and Click-and-Cross, were the most successful new designs for users with motor impairments, reducing selection time for small targets by 19%, corrective submovements by 45%, and error rate by up to 82% compared to the point cursor. Although the Bubble cursor also improved performance, participants with motor impairments unanimously preferred the enhanced area cursors.

cursor

In Proceedings of UIST 2005
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Predictive interaction using the delphian desktop (p. 133-141)

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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Abracadabra: wireless, high-precision, and unpowered finger input for very small mobile devices (p. 121-124)

Abstract plus

We present Abracadabra, a magnetically driven input technique that offers users wireless, unpowered, high fidelity finger input for mobile devices with very small screens. By extending the input area to many times the size of the device's screen, our approach is able to offer a high C-D gain, enabling fine motor control. Additionally, screen occlusion can be reduced by moving interaction off of the display and into unused space around the device. We discuss several example applications as a proof of concept. Finally, results from our user study indicate radial targets as small as 16 degrees can achieve greater than 92% selection accuracy, outperforming comparable radial, touch-based finger input.

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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ARC-Pad: absolute+relative cursor positioning for large displays with a mobile touchscreen (p. 153-156)

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We introduce ARC-Pad (Absolute+Relative Cursor pad), a novel technique for interacting with large displays using a mobile phone's touchscreen. In ARC-Pad we combine ab-solute and relative cursor positioning. Tapping with ARC-Pad causes the cursor to jump to the corresponding location on the screen, providing rapid movement across large distances. For fine position control, users can also clutch using relative mode. Unlike prior hybrid cursor positioning techniques, ARC-Pad does not require an explicit switch between relative and absolute modes. We compared ARC-Pad with the relative positioning commonly found on touchpads. Users were given a target acquisition task on a large display, and results showed that they were faster with ARC-Pad, without sacrificing accuracy. Users welcomed the benefits associated with ARC-Pad.

multiple cursor

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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The satellite cursor: achieving MAGIC pointing without gaze tracking using multiple cursors (p. 163-172)

Abstract plus

We present the satellite cursor - a novel technique that uses multiple cursors to improve pointing performance by reducing input movement. The satellite cursor associates every target with a separate cursor in its vicinity for pointing, which realizes the MAGIC (manual and gaze input cascade) pointing method without gaze tracking. We discuss the problem of visual clutter caused by multiple cursors and propose several designs to mitigate it. Two controlled experiments were conducted to evaluate satellite cursor performance in a simple reciprocal pointing task and a complex task with multiple targets of varying layout densities. Results show the satellite cursor can save significant mouse movement and consequently pointing time, especially for sparse target layouts, and that satellite cursor performance can be accurately modeled by Fitts' Law.