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social

social activity

In Proceedings of UIST 1995
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Social activity indicators: interface components for CSCW systems (p. 159-168)

social and environmental improvement

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Connected environments (p. 183-184)

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Can new interfaces contribute to social and environmental improvement? For all the care, wit and brilliance that UIST innovations can contribute, can they actually make things better - better in the sense of public good - not merely lead to easier to use or more efficient consumer goods? This talk will explore the impact of interface technology on society and the environment, and examine engineered systems that invite participation, document change over time, and suggest alternative courses of action that are ethical and sustainable, drawing on examples from a diverse series of experimental designs and site-specific work Natalie has created throughout her career.

social computing

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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Collabio: a game for annotating people within social networks (p. 97-100)

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We present Collabio, a social tagging game within an online social network that encourages friends to tag one another. Collabio's approach of incentivizing members of the social network to generate information about each other produces personalizing information about its users. We report usage log analysis, survey data, and a rating exercise demonstrating that Collabio tags are accurate and augment information that could have been scraped online.

social effect of technology

social network

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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QuME: a mechanism to support expertise finding in online help-seeking communities (p. 111-114)

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Help-seeking communities have been playing an increasingly critical role in the way people seek and share information. However, traditional help-seeking mechanisms of these online communities have some limitations. In this paper, we describe an expertise-finding mechanism that attempts to alleviate the limitations caused by not knowing users' expertise levels. As a result of using social network data from the online community, this mechanism can automatically infer expertise level. This allows, for example, a question list to be personalized to the user's expertise level as well as to keyword similarity. We believe this expertise location mechanism will facilitate the development of next generation help-seeking communities.

social software

In Proceedings of UIST 2007
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Socially augmenting employee profiles with people-tagging (p. 91-100)

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Employee directories play a valuable role in helping people find others to collaborate with, solve a problem, or provide needed expertise. Serving this role successfully requires accurate and up-to-date user profiles, yet few users take the time to maintain them. In this paper, we present a system that enables users to tag other users with key words that are displayed on their profiles. We discuss how people-tagging is a form of social bookmarking that enables people to organize their contacts into groups, annotate them with terms supporting future recall, and search for people by topic area. In addition, we show that people-tagging has a valuable side benefit: it enables the community to collectively maintain each others' interest and expertise profiles. Our user studies suggest that people tag other people as a form of contact management and that the tags they have been given are accurate descriptions of their interests and expertise. Moreover, none of the people interviewed reported offensive or inappropriate tags. Based on our results, we believe that peopletagging will become an important tool for relationship management in an organization.

social stream

In Proceedings of UIST 2010
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Eddi: interactive topic-based browsing of social status streams (p. 303-312)

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Twitter streams are on overload: active users receive hundreds of items per day, and existing interfaces force us to march through a chronologically-ordered morass to find tweets of interest. We present an approach to organizing a user's own feed into coherently clustered trending topics for more directed exploration. Our Twitter client, called Eddi, groups tweets in a user's feed into topics mentioned explicitly or implicitly, which users can then browse for items of interest. To implement this topic clustering, we have developed a novel algorithm for discovering topics in short status updates powered by linguistic syntactic transformation and callouts to a search engine. An algorithm evaluation reveals that search engine callouts outperform other approaches when they employ simple syntactic transformation and backoff strategies. Active Twitter users evaluated Eddi and found it to be a more efficient and enjoyable way to browse an overwhelming status update feed than the standard chronological interface.

social tagging

In Proceedings of UIST 2009
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Collabio: a game for annotating people within social networks (p. 97-100)

Abstract plus

We present Collabio, a social tagging game within an online social network that encourages friends to tag one another. Collabio's approach of incentivizing members of the social network to generate information about each other produces personalizing information about its users. We report usage log analysis, survey data, and a rating exercise demonstrating that Collabio tags are accurate and augment information that could have been scraped online.

social visualization